Tag Archives: Global

Migrations: Journeys through British Art

There is just over a month left to see this great exhibition currently on at Tate Britain. Migrations: Journeys through British Art:

“explores British art through the theme of migration from 1500 to the present day, reflecting the remit of Tate Britain Collection displays. From the sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Flemish and Dutch landscape and still-life painters who came to Britain in search of new patrons, through moments of political and religious unrest, to Britain’s current position within the global landscape, the exhibition reveals how British art has been fundamentally shaped by successive waves of migration. Cutting a swathe through 500 years of history, and tracing not only the movement of artists but also the circulation of visual languages and ideas, this exhibition includes works by artists from LelyKneller,Kauffman to SargentEpsteinMondrianBombergBowling and the Black Audio Film Collective as well as recent work by contemporary artists”

There are also a number of events related to this exhibition upcoming. The first is one tonight:

25 June 2012 from 6.30 – 8.30pm: Personal Journeys: Bonnie Greer on Migrations: “Join playwright and critic Bonnie Greer on a personal journey through the exhibition, as she talks about what migration means to her.”

while in two weeks time:

11 July 2012 from 6.30 -8.30pm Artist Talk: David Medalla: “Born in the Philippines and based in Britain since the Sixties artist David Medalla describes himself as a citizen of the world. His work does not come from one single cultural perspective but draws from his constant travelling, inspired by the places and the people he meets. In this talk Medalla speaks about his practice spanning painting, sculpture, installation and performance, and shares his thoughts on the theme of Migration in art.”

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International Workshop: Beyond the Line – Cultural Constructions of the Sea

The international workshop “Beyond the Line – Cultural Constructions of the Sea” examines the relationship between land and sea. It investigates how the currently changing constellations in South-South relationships can be understood historically and culturally. If the active participation of the regions south of the Sahara since early modern times is denied, what is the situation today? And beyond that: is it justified in any way to attribute a historical insignificance to regions neighboring Africa on the Atlantic and Indian Oceans? These questions will be analyzed in the framework of a current trend in the social and cultural sciences that is called the “oceanic turn.” The symposium aims to pursue these questions and make its own contribution to them. Participants present the Atlantic and Indian Oceans as a cultural space. Individual panel discussions examine case studies of literature, migration, piracy, and trade cultures. In this way, research results on the sub-Saharan part of Africa will be investigated in their relationship to the Atlantic and Indian Oceans and new approaches will be formulated. Conceived by Michael Mann and Ineke Phaf-Rheinberger.

June 22 – 23, 2012

Institute of Asian and African Studies (IAAW)
Invalidenstraße 118, Room 217
Humboldt-Universität Berlin

To view the full programme including paper abstracts click here

Open Arts Archive Publish Video and Audio Online

New audio and video files on a wide variety of themes have been added to the Open Arts Archive recently to join with an established archive of resources. These include:

Contemporary Art: World Currents – Panel Discussion

“This panel discussion, in collaboration with the Open University, explores Terry Smith’s book Contemporary Art: World Currents (Laurence King, 2011).

It was part of a launch for the book given by Sandy Nairne, Director of the National Portrait Gallery.

Speakers include: art historians Terry Smith, Anthony Downey and Leon Wainwright, and Tessa Jackson, OBE, Director of the Institute for International Visual Arts (inIVA).”

Leon Wainwright offering some thoughts on ‘Hymn to the Sun IV’

“This recording was made on the occasion of the exhibition Aubrey Williams: Atlantic Fire, at the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, from 15 January to 11 April, 2010, and played on an audio loop for visitors alongside the display. Aubrey Williams: Atlantic Fire was curated by Reyahn King (Director of Art Galleries, National Museums Liverpool) and Leon Wainwright (Dept. of Art History, The Open University). It was the first nationally-funded, major retrospective exhibition of the Guyana-born painter (1926-1990). In the recording Leon Wainwright offers some thoughts on a painting by Aubrey Williams, his ‘Hymn to the Sun IV’ of 1984, one of the artist’s Olmec-Maya series (oil on canvas, 119 x 178 cm).”

Click here to read Leon Wainwright’s 2010 catalogue contribution for this exhibition, Aubrey Williams: Atlantic fire.

Rashid Rana and David Elliot in Conversation

“On Saturday 1st October 2011, as part of ‘Rashid Rana: Everything Is Happening At Once’ exhibition at The Cornerhouse, Manchester artist Rashid Rana was joined in conversation with David Elliott, a freelance international curator based in Hong Kong and Berlin.

A small audience heard a presentation by the artist of his practice. The event was presented as part of the Asia Triennial Manchester 2011 with the support of the Lisson Gallery.”

Video: Stuart Hall On the Limits and Possibilities of Cosmopolitanism

This week’s video is an interview with Stuart Hall on the subject of Cosmopolitanism. Conducted by Pnina Werbner in March 2006, this interview is part of a series of video Interviews with Leading Thinkers undertaken by researchers at the University of Cambridge, now digitized and available online.

In this 40 minute video Pnina Werbner asks Stuart Hall to talk through his understanding of the place cosmopolitanism has: as a discursive concept and; in its applications to the contemporary world. Distinguishing between a cosmopolitanism of the above and the forced or obligatory cosmopolitanism of the below – which he terms ‘vernacular cosmopolitanism’ – Hall considers the connections between cosmopolitanism and: diaspora, universality, liberalism, identity and globalization.

A particularly interesting conversation ensues as Werbner asks Hall to focus on his personal relationship to and experience of cosmopolitanism. This leads Hall to consider understandings, realisations and possibilities of the concept across time and space: in Caribbean, African, European and Middle Eastern contexts of the past, present and future.

To view other videos in the Interviews with Leading Thinkers series click here.

New Publication: Jack Johnson Rebel Sojourner

Jack Johnson, Rebel Sojourner: Boxing in the Shadow of the Global Color Line by Theresa Rundstedtler is a new publication by University of California Press now available to order online.

In his day, Jack Johnson—born in Texas, the son of former slaves—was the most famous black man on the planet. As the first African American World Heavyweight Champion (1908–1915), he publicly challenged white supremacy at home and abroad, enjoying the same audacious lifestyle of conspicuous consumption, masculine bravado, and interracial love wherever he traveled. Jack Johnson, Rebel Sojourner provides the first in-depth exploration of Johnson’s battles against the color line in places as far-flung as Sydney, London, Cape Town, Paris, Havana, and Mexico City. In relating this dramatic story, Theresa Runstedtler constructs a global history of race, gender, and empire in the early twentieth century.

“Theresa Runstedtler traces Jack Johnson’s fabulous, furious, iconic life across five continents and through four paradigms (race, masculinity, imperialism, and popular culture), setting a formidably high bar in the emerging genre of transnational biography. Jack Johnson: Rebel Sojourner is a groundbreaking achievement.”—David Levering Lewis, author of When Harlem Was in Vogue

“This is a brilliantly researched and original study of the transnational career of the black American boxer Jack Johnson. In lucid and engaging prose, Theresa Runstedtler traces Johnson’s travels across multiple continents, showing how Johnson’s life serves as a cultural compass for the intersecting worlds of American, British, and French empire and ideas of race at the turn of the last century. This marvelous contribution to the burgeoning literature on the popular culture of imperialism and transnationalism will find a wide and appreciative audience among scholars of empire, American history, and African American studies.”¬—Kevin Gaines, author of American Africans in Ghana: Black Expatriates in the Civil Rights Era.

For more information on this exciting new publication click here.

To order a copy of the book online you can visit the University of California Press or order on Amazon.

(Information via University of California Press)

Timed Out: Art and the transnational Caribbean

Timed out: Art and the Transnational Caribbean (Rethinking Art’s Histories) is a new book (Manchester University Press, 2011) by Leon Wainwright.

‘Timed out’ is a pioneering study of modern and contemporary art in the aftermath of empire. It addresses the current ‘global turn’ in the study of art by way of the transnational Caribbean, offering an in-depth account of the Atlantic world in relation to the mainstream history of art. It looks at why art of the Anglophone Caribbean and its diaspora have been placed not only ‘outside’ but ‘behind’ the dominant art canons, and how the politics of space and time can be used to rethink the global geography of art.

‘Timed out’ will appeal to all those working in the field of modern and contemporary art and world art history, transnationalism and the geography of global visual culture. To read more click here…

Leon Wainwright is Lecturer in Art History at the Open University. Click here to find out more about the author and selected earlier publications.